Different writing tasks require different thesis statements.

Different writing tasks require different thesis statements.

You might care to explore in a paper, you can make any number of assertions – some relatively simple, some complex as you can see, for any subject. It is on such basis as these assertions for themselves expectations for reading that you set yourself an agenda in writing a paper – and readers set. The more ambitious the thesis, the more complicated is the paper and also the greater will be the readers’ expectations.

With the Thesis

The thesis that is explanatory often developed in response to short-answer exam questions that call for information, not analysis (e.g., « List and explain proposed modifications to contemporary American democracy »). The explanatory but thesis that is mildly argumentative appropriate for organizing reports (even lengthy ones), along with essay questions that call for many analysis (e.g., « In what ways would be the recent proposals to change American democracy significant? »). The strongly argumentative thesis is used to arrange papers and exam questions that call for information, analysis, and the writer’s forcefully stated point of view (e.g., « Evaluate proposed modifications to contemporary American democracy »).

The strongly argumentative thesis, needless to say, is the riskiest for the three, since you must unequivocally state your role while making it appear reasonable – which requires that you offer evidence and defend against logical objections. But such intellectual risks pay dividends, and you will provoke challenging responses that enliven classroom discussions if you become involved enough in your work to make challenging assertions.